5 tips for great teams | Corporate Culture | Six and a Half Consulting
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5 Tips for Great Teams


5 Tips for Great Teams

There likely isn’t a manager, boss, or C-level executive who doesn’t want to have a stronger, more united team.  But bringing the best out of employees is something that is often easier said than done. That’s why studies routinely show that an unacceptably high number up of employees – up to 70 percent – are disengaged, emotionally disconnected from their companies.  The truth is, building thriving corporate culture is not that arduous.  The real challenge is whether or not managers can stay consistent to the work required.

Here are 5 simple tips that, if applied consistently, are sure to lead to great results:

Lead from above  – There is a saying amongst some parents who efficacy is questionable: ‘do as I say, not as I do.’ Rarely are the long-term outcomes positive for either the parent or the child when this parenting style is employed. The same holds true for employee (who most definitely should not be treated as children).  If you want your organization’s culture to maintain certain standards and characteristics, then those behaviours must start at the top.   Ultimately, culture is everyone’s job.  But the precedent must come from above.

Find ways to for your team members to grow– Studies show that high-performing companies routinely motivate their people by emphasizing career development.  Authors like Daniel Pink whose work on intrinsic motivation confirm this.  For employees to connect with their companies, they must feel that a) the work that they are doing matters, (e.g. is a smaller piece of greater whole) and b) that they feel challenged. As a manager, you must take active interest in your team member’s career development.  In return, they will show interest in your team.

Ambitious but not unrealistic expectations – Goals, like vision statements, are meant to stretch people ever beyond their limits.  As a manager, team members should know that your expectations are high, but not unreasonable. Excellence is expected at all times.  Competence breeds confidence, and successfully achieving ambitious goals motivates them to do it again..

Consistent and honest feedback – People want to know how they are doing — both the good and the bad.  The challenge is that most managers rarely focus on the former, and leave the later for awkward year end KPIs. Instead, managers ought to provide regular (weekly is best) check-ins with their team members to receive praise for jobs well done, and input if a course-correct is needed.

Get intimate – Almost every reputable study out there on employee engagement points to one consistent fact — that engaged employees feel relationally connected with the people they work with. A managers job really is one of relationships.  How well do you actually know your team members?  Do they trust you? The more you strive to connect on a human level with each of your employees, the more unified and impactful your organization will become.

Admittedly, nothing on this list is revolutionary or ground breaking.  But as is often the case in life, the most profound truths lie in the mundane.  And what separates mediocre companies (and managers) from great ones is how diligently they work at these straightforward tasks.

For more information on our leadership developmentteam development offerings and customized workshops make sure to visit our site.

 

 

Casey Miller
Casey@SixandaHalfConsulting.com

Casey A. Miller, President of 6 ½ Consulting, is on a mission: to help create environments where people value one another. In his consultancy, this means teaching business owners and executives how to build workplaces that inspire. In return, their organizations see positive returns on their time, teams, and profits.

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